Archives

CONNECT WITH US
Sign-Up for Titi Tidbits e-Newsletter

Loading...
rss

In the News

Updates from Proyecto Tití

Tití Tidbits | March Edition

Tití Tidbits | March Edition



Ever wonder how you count cotton-top tamarins, a small one pound monkey that lives about 30 ft. high in the tropical forest?  It’s no easy task, but we have developed a technique that allows us to play the calls of unfamiliar cotton-tops to simulate a stranger moving into a family’s territory.  When the monkeys hear the calls, they come to investigate this new stranger.  In 2005, we used this technique to conduct the first population census of cotton-top tamarins.  Results from the study estimated the wild population at less than 7,500 individuals, representing a substantial decline. On the basis of those findings, the species was reclassified as Critically Endangered and we began an intensive effort to raise awareness about the need to protect cotton-top tamarins.

So how are we doing?  The results of our newly published census are in and the good news is that the population of cotton-top tamarins remains relatively stable and there is little change in the amount of suitable forest habitat left for the monkeys. A relatively stable population for a Critically Endangered species can be considered a conservation success. 

One explanation for this stability of the population is that our programs are working! Through our educational programs and public awareness campaigns, Proyecto Tití has been leading the way to bring increased awareness to the conservation efforts of this species and its habitat in Colombia. 
As most of the remaining habitats for cotton-top tamarins are isolated patches of forest, the focus now is protecting and connecting remaining land areas and promoting new forest growth, which is essential for increasing cotton-top tamarin populations. 

Learn more about how we are saving trees for tamarins in our upcoming April issue!


In addition to habitat loss, another threat to the survival of the cotton-top tamarin is collection for the illegal pet trade in Colombia. We focus our education programs on creating awareness about the challenges facing cotton-top tamarins and teaching students that live in rural communities near the forest how they can help to protect them.

Tití Kids is a program for elementary students in grades 3-5. Through interactive activities and creative storytelling, students learn the differences between domestic animals and wildlife. Role play and fictional characters take the students on a journey to understand the importance of native wildlife remaining in the wild. The children commit to not keeping wildlife as pets and to sharing what they've learned with their families. Pre and post program assessments show a significant increase in the children's abilities to distinguish domestic animals from wildlife. 


Education programs build a connection between communities and nature. By reducing the number of animals removed from the wild, this next generation of conservation leaders is helping to contribute to the long-term survival of cotton-top tamarins in Colombia.

 

 

blog comments powered by Disqus

Position Statement

Proyecto Tití's Position Statement on nonhuman primates in the Media

WHEREAS live nonhuman primates are often portrayed in the media as frivolous caricatures of humans, dressed in clothing and trained to do tricks on command for the amusement of the general public but with disregard to the welfare and conservation consequences; and
WHEREAS many nonhuman primates used as actors in movies and television and as photo props for commercials and greeting cards are often removed from their mothers shortly after birth and are denied opportunities for normal social and psychological development; and
WHEREAS the use of nonhuman primates in this industry often involves aversive techniques to maintain control of these animals; and
WHEREAS the inappropriate portrayal of nonhuman primates inaccurately conveys their biology and conservation status and may affect public attitudes including those in range countries where interactions with these animals have potential damaging consequences; and
WHEREAS evidence suggests that many nonhuman primate species are susceptible to many of the pathogenic infections that afflict humans and the transmission of infection can occur in both directions, especially in performing circumstances in which primates are in direct proximity with public audiences including children and the elderly,
Proyecto Titi Inc. and Fundacion Proyecto Titi therefore opposes the use of nonhuman primates as performers, photo props or actors.